Frocked and Frustration

Pierside in Japan with Pendergrass
Pierside in Japan with Pendergrass

So, after taking the Navy advancement exam six times, I finally made E-5 off the test as opposed to re-enlisting for it. It’s nice finally getting a pay raise and moving up in the Navy. If I don’t re-enlist in the future, this will be my rank when I get out of the Navy too because I don’t have enough time left on my contract to make E-6. For those of you that this sounds Greek to, I was the equivalent of a Corporal in the Army, and now I’m at the rank of a Sergent. Navy ranks are strange to most. Now I’m a Petty Officer Second Class, which makes my title MM2(SS) now, or Machinist’s Mate Second Class Submarine Qualified. Yep, it’s kind of confusing to have so many words and titles. The Navy is pretty good at that.

Also unique to the Navy is getting Frocked. I’m not sure if this is just a tradition, or just a way to save some money, but getting frocked means that you are given the rank of a second class, but you’re still paid as a third class for a few months. You accept all the duties and responsibilities of a second class, but with no benefits. And if you do get in trouble, you’ll be bumped down two ranks instead of one. Hah, that would be a pretty huge downer.

Speaking of huge downers, getting the news of an extension on deployment is a lot like being kicked in the gut when you’re already down. Almost every division on board has a deployment tracker on the ship’s internet, and it was horrifying to see our percentage complete drop more than 10% after the news of our imminent extension. One more month out to sea. 37 days more, to be precise. It was a huge blow to hear this news.

Carissa was already planning events and vacations for when I was supposed to come home, and now all that has to wait. It’s a shame that I have to be apart from my family even more than I already was supposed to be. But, what can I do but do my job and continue on?

At least in my job, things are not as tremendously confusing and hectic as I used to think they were. Amazingly, doing the same thing day on day, week on week, month on month, makes you pretty proficient at getting things done. I have no idea how many chemistry samples I’ve done, but it has to be in the upper hundreds. By the time deployment is finished, I’ll have completed around two thousand maintenance items by myself. That’s kind of hard to believe. Downing is constantly thanking me for doing a good job and praising my dedication to the division. Although the rest of the boat just assumes I sleep all day because of my weird schedule, I’ve made sure that reactor laboratory division is a quiet success. If people don’t know about us, it means that we’re doing things right. I like to keep it that way.

Well, here’s to an extra month of that, I guess.

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